The Compassion of Judas Iscariot

Judas Iscariot Retiring from the Last Supper, Carl Bloch

During Holy Week we recall the events leading up to Christ’s crucifixion, and the men who played a part in having him executed: The religious aristocracy, Pontius Pilate and even one of Jesus’ closest followers.

The name of Judas Iscariot went down to the pages of history as the man who betrayed Jesus. Luke attributes this to Satan.  Matthew and Mark say it was because of greed.  John points to both, and also mentions theft as one of his sins (John 12:1-8).  I think if we could travel back in time to the first century and actually see Jesus and His disciples, we wouldn’t see Judas Iscariot as the sinister man we would suspect. In fact, he might even appear to be compassionate.

For example, when Mary began to wipe Jesus’ feet with expensive perfume Jesus was deeply touched, but it was Judas who pointed out that this costly perfume should have been sold and the money given to the poor (John 12:1-8). Those listening may have thought, “That’s a good point.  You know, Judas is a good steward, and he has his priorities straight.”

John, of course, reminds us that people are not always as they appear.  As Jesus would say, people will eventually know us by the fruit we bear (Matthew 7:16, 12:33; Luke 6:43-44).

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About Corey Sharpe

Where do we get our beliefs? Three theological perspectives have significantly shaped my Christian identity: Evangelicalism, the early Methodist tradition and liberation theology. From my coming to faith in a Baptist church and throughout my education in a Baptist school and college, I was nurtured by convictions that emphasized a spiritual rebirth, a personal relationship with Jesus Christ and the centrality of the Bible. Even when I disagree with certain aspects of evangelicalism, it has deeply influenced my sense of what it means to be a follower of Jesus Christ. My seminary studies spawned my interest in early Methodism, particularly its approach to spiritual formation. Its leaders were convinced that only a foundation of doctrine and discipline would lead to a meaningful transformation of the heart and mind. In other words, having the mind of Christ enables me to be more like Christ. Life in a suburban culture obscures the increasing gap between the poor and rich, as well as the Bible’s close identification with the poor. My doctoral work in socio-cultural context exposed me to liberation theology, which helps me see redemptive history as a history of oppressed groups, written from the perspective of the powerless, about a God who is actively involved with the poor in their struggles. I am now the pastor at Huntingtown United Methodist Church in Calvert County, Maryland. Together my wife and I are raising 4 young theologians.
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One Response to The Compassion of Judas Iscariot

  1. Pingback: The Compassion of Judas Iscariot « HUNTINGTOWN UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

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